Research

CS10K:CS1C@OC-Building a Local Area Network of Computer Science Teachers

PI: Debra J. Richardson (Informatics)
CO-PIs: Rebecca Black (Informatics), Elizabeth A. Simon (UCSD), Elizabeth A. van Es, and Mark Warschauer

Funder: National Science Foundation

Duration: 2016-2019

Project Description

The University of California Irvine (UCI) has undertaken a project, called CS1C@OC, to provide in-service teachers in Orange County with a program of study that will satisfy California's new teacher certification pathway in CS. Despite the demonstrated need for students to learn foundational computer science skills, few K-12 students have access to rigorous CS courses. CS remains privileged knowledge, and improving access to this knowledge is one of the major economic security and social justice issues of the 21st century. The CS community has struggled to overcome issues of access and equity, and some enormous strides have come in teaching tools, pedagogies, and standards. But none of these accomplishments can be broadly implemented or sustainable without teaching certification pathways for CS teachers and teacher preparation programs to prepare teachers in computing, especially those teaching in underserved communities. CS1C@OC will develop such a pathway.

CS1C@0C aims to

  1. increase in-service teachers’ CS content knowledge and their competence and confidence in evidence-based pedagogical practices for teaching computer science to diverse learners;
  2. increase diverse students' knowledge and skills in computational thinking and computer science principles and their interest in taking more CS courses; and
  3. increase the capacity of Orange County schools to provide CS courses.

CS1C@OC is recruiting 100 secondary school teachers largely from low-income communities, with preference given to teachers who, along with their school, make a commitment to teach Exploring Computer Science (ECS) and/or Computer Science Principles (CSP). UCI will provide summer courses in CS principles and pedagogy that will satisfy the requirements for the CS supplementary authorization while emphasizing CS instructional approaches that have proven successful with females and students from low-income, underrepresented communities. It will also develop a hybrid professional learning community for participating teachers so they can share information and experiences, continue to learn from each other, and have further opportunities to develop themselves both personally and professionally throughout the school year.

The project will evaluate impact on teacher learning and development as well as impact on student learning and attitude changes.